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News from the John W. Kluge Center: Starting NOW: Live Pillars of Democracy Event on the Administrative State

Starting NOW: Live Pillars of Democracy Event on the Administrative State

Our Pillars of Democracy event on the federal judiciary is about to begin, at 4pm. Click here to start watching.

Much of the work of the US Government occurs away from the spotlight. Unlike senators, Supreme Court justices, or presidents, public servants in the administrative state are rarely mentioned in the news. Still, the decisions of higher-profile public figures would have little effect without the agencies and the people in them that put policy into practice. Indeed the regulatory state effectively comprises a fourth branch of government. This arrangement can create problems for accountability though, as the administrative state’s insulation from elections and public scrutiny breeds distrust in the public.

Click here to start watching.

You can now watch the video of our last Pillars of Democracy event, on the judiciary, as well.

With Pillars of Democracy, the Kluge Center, in partnership with the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute, brings scholars together to examine the bedrock institutions of American life and to try to understand how those institutions have lost the respect and confidence of the American people.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: This Thursday: Pillars of Democracy a The Administrative State

This Thursday: Pillars of Democracy – The Administrative State

Much of the work of the US Government occurs away from the spotlight. Unlike senators, Supreme Court justices, or presidents, public servants in the administrative state are rarely mentioned in the news. Still, the decisions of higher-profile public figures would have little effect without the agencies and the people in them that put policy into practice. Indeed the regulatory state effectively comprises a fourth branch of government. This arrangement can create problems for accountability though, as the administrative state’s insulation from elections and public scrutiny breeds distrust in the public.

Join the John W. Kluge Center, the American Enterprise Institute, and the Brookings Institution for a conversation on the causes of that distrust and how the administrative state can win the confidence of the American people.

This event will take place on Thursday, October 21, live on Zoom at 4pm. Free registration is available here.

Panelists:

Beth Simone Noveck is the author of “Solving Public Problems: How to Fix Our Government and Change Our World.” She is a professor at Northeastern University, where she directs the Burnes Center for Social Change and its partner project, The Governance Lab (The GovLab) and directs its MacArthur Research Network on Opening Governance. Previously, Beth served in the White House as the first United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer and director of the White House Open Government Initiative under President Obama. UK Prime Minister David Cameron appointed her senior advisor for Open Government. She currently serves as New Jersey's first Chief Innovation Officer and on Chancellor Angela Merkel Digital Council.

Jeffrey A. Rosen is a nonresident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He previously served as acting attorney general and deputy attorney general of the United States, deputy secretary of transportation, and general counsel and senior policy adviser at the White House’s Office of Management and Budget. At AEI, Mr. Rosen focuses on administrative law and regulation, constitutionalism, and legal institutions. He also follows transportation, federal budget, and technology issues.

Susan Dudley is Director of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, which she established in 2009 to improve regulatory policy through research, education, and outreach.  She is also a distinguished professor of practice in the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration. She is a past president of the Society for Benefit Cost Analysis, a senior fellow with the Administrative Conference of the United States, a National Academy of Public Administration fellow, on the board of Economists Incorporated, and chair of the Regulatory Transparency Project’s Regulatory Process working group.

 


News from the John W. Kluge Center: In the Know #14: The Newsletter of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress

In the Know #14: The Newsletter of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress

We at the Kluge Center would like to thank all of you, our supporters and friends, for your continued support and engagement. This newsletter- provides - updates on Kluge Center activities, including our events, fellowship competitions, and blog posts. Please share this information with anyone who might be interested in following Kluge, applying for fellowships, or viewing our events. Our dedication to bringing you the highest quality conversations on important public issues and scholarship - continues. Let’s keep the conversation going.

John Haskell, Director of the Kluge Center

 

Kluge Kudos

Below are links to scholarly articles of interest by and featuring current Kluge scholars and alumni, as well as awards, publications, events, and other accomplishments.  If you have suggestions for featured items (subject to Library of Congress policy), please send them to scholarly@loc.gov for consideration. Please do not provide links to book reviews or sales sites, per Library of Congress policy.

Wayne Wiegand’s (Distinguished Visiting Scholar) book, “American Public School Librarianship: A History,” was released by the Johns Hopkins University Press in September, 2021. It is the first comprehensive evaluative, analytical, and critical history of a ubiquitous educational institution that was built over the generations by hundreds of thousands of public school librarians serving hundreds of millions of public school students K-12.

Aynne Kokas (Kluge Fellow) published an article with the Wilson Center called "The CCP 100th in Media Narratives: Appeasing Young Viewers Puts Party Leadership to the Test.” In it, she discusses the relationship of the Chinese youth to their government and the measures that the government has taken to try to embolden youth support. Furthermore, Kokas was a speaker on the Need To Know Podcast Series, talking about recent Chinese crackdowns in the media and technology. In an Atlantic article, Kokas provided her thoughts on the entertainment industry’s dependence on the Chinese market. In Business Insider, she wrote about the increasing tension between entertainers and government regulations amidst media crackdowns in China. Kokas also commented in an article for Voice of America about the pressures the Chinese and US entertainment industries are facing. The article was written in simplified and traditional Chinese.

Zachary Schrag (Kluge Fellow) published, “The Fires of Philadelphia: Citizen-Soldiers, Nativists, and the 1844 Riots Over the Soul of a Nation” with Pegasus books. Early research on this book began when he was a Kluge Fellow in 2009, and he returned over the years to the Library of Congress for additional research.

Klaus Larres’s (Kissinger Chair) book, “Uncertain Allies: Nixon, Kissinger, and the Threat of a United Europe,” from Yale University Press, will be released in November. A majority of the research is based on material from the Kissinger papers at the Library of Congress. In addition, he edited and contributed a chapter to “Dictators and Autocrats: Securing Power Across Global Politics,” published by Routledge, to be released in November.

Hal Brands (Kissinger Chair) wrote three articles for American Enterprise Institute: One op-ed titled, “Biden can leave Afghanistan but not the Middle East” discusses how America became interested in the Middle East and how the US Military leaving Afghanistan could increase the dilemma we face in the area. He looked at the similarities between ending the war in Afghanistan and the ending of the Vietnam War in, “For a humiliated superpower, Vietnam shows a path back.” He wrote about how exit from Afghanistan will affect US foreign policy in, “Biden’s Afghan withdrawal achieved nothing but disaster.” Hal also wrote an article in Bloomberg titled, “Huawei’s Decline Shows Why China Will Struggle to Dominate.”

Ignacio Sanchez Prado (Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South) gave a lecture in September on popular cosmopolitanism, exploring intersections of mid-century Mexican cinema into the aesthetics and politics of emerging world cinema maps.

Jemima Hodgkinson (British Research Council Fellow) published an article in Atlantic Studies on research she completed at the Kluge Center titled, “The mediated text: Transatlantic circulation among periodicals of interwar African American poetry”. In the article, she discussed transatlantic circulation of African American poetry in the early 1900s.

Sarah Binder (Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance) was quoted in the New York Times article, “Should Biden Reappoint Jerome Powell? It Depends on His Theory of Change.” She said, “Part of the Biden mantra has been to restore civility and downplay partisan tensions. It’s somewhat fortuitous for Biden that if he wants to reappoint Powell he can do it under the guise of restoring the independence of the Fed even though Powell thoroughly fits his views on monetary policy.”

Martha Jones (Distinguished Visiting Scholar, beginning January 2022) will write four books for Basic Books according to a New York Times article. The first book will examine the history and legacy of slavery’s sexual violence.

Irene Wu (Visiting Scholar) published an article in India Review titled, “India and the soft power rubric: the relevance of migrants, students, visitors and movies.” The article explored India’s soft power sources, origins, deficits, and applications.

 

The Pillars of Democracy

Much of the work of the US Government occurs away from the spotlight. Unlike senators, Supreme Court justices, or presidents, public servants in the administrative state are rarely mentioned in the news. Still, the decisions of higher-profile public figures would have little effect without the agencies and the people in them that put policy into practice. Indeed the regulatory state effectively comprises a fourth branch of government. This arrangement can create problems for accountability though, as the administrative state’s insulation from elections and public scrutiny breeds distrust in the public. Join the John W. Kluge Center, the American Enterprise Institute, and the Brookings Institution for a conversation on the causes of that distrust and how the administrative state can win the confidence of the American people. This event will take place live on October 21, at 4pm. Click here for more information and registration.

 

 

Blog Posts

In her first blog post for the Kluge Center, Research Assistant Sophia Zahner announced a call for applications to the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation. Zahner also published an interview with Kluge Fellow Caroline Riley on “Thérèse Bonney: Curator, Photographer, Syndicator, Spy.” We commemorated the recent death of Cary Maguire, benefactor of the Cary and Ann Maguire Chair in Ethics and American History at the Kluge Center. The Kluge Center welcomed a new cohort of fellows and chairs starting in residence in fall 2021 and announced the new Jon B. Lovelace Fellow. We recapped some of the main points in the Pillars of Democracy event on the US Presidency, and previewed the September 30 Pillars of Democracy event on the federal judiciary, which features former Maguire Chair Cathleen Kaveny of Boston College, and includes Randall Kennedy of Harvard University on the panel. The event video will be available October 14.

 

Alumni Spotlight

Jesse J. Holland

Distinguished Visiting Scholar, 2019

 

What was most valuable about your time at the Kluge Center?

My time at the Kluge Center gave me a chance to work on a project that I’ve been dreaming of for a while: the untold story of the people of Freedman’s Village, an African American settlement that sat on the grounds of Arlington National Cemetery. Using the resources of the Library of Congress, I was able to look at and absorb some of the original stories of these forgotten people and begin to put together their fascinating story. The resources of the Kluge Center and the time that the Kluge Center provides for this kind of work was invaluable to me, and it put me on the road to bringing this story to Americans and making it part of our American historical tapestry. 

 

Where are you now?

I’m now a professor of journalism at the School of Media & Public Affairs at George Washington University, which was my next stop after leaving the Kluge Center. I’m still serving as the Saturday host for Washington Journal on C-SPAN, and I’m also exploring my passion for comic books, science fiction and fantasy writing. You can see me discussing the Library of Congress’s comic book collection here for the Kluge Center, and you can also check out some of the comic books I’ve written for DC Comics by looking up “Superman: Red And Blue #3” and the Heritage chapter of DC Comics’ Represent line. I’m also still writing fiction, and you can see my latest tale of the Marvel Comics’ Black Panther character in the “Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda” anthology, where I served as editor. I’m also working on a book based on my research at the Library of Congress on Freedman’s Village, and working on an African American journalism anthology. I try to keep busy! 

 

Do you use social media, blogs, or websites to engage in public scholarship?

I can be found EVERYWHERE on social media, on Facebook, on Twitter, and on Instagram. Follow me on these exciting social media sites for all of the upcoming news about what I’m doing next!

 

Did You Know? Interesting Facts About the Kluge Center

Did you know that Kluge center has hosted 455 postdoctoral Fellows?

 

Social Media:

Be sure to follow our Twitter account to get all the latest on our blog posts, open applications, and any future events.

 

We Want to Hear From You:

Do you have thoughts on what would make an interesting blog post? Submissions for the Kluge Kudos and Media Mentions section? What about an idea for event programming? Please reply to this email or contact scholarly@loc.gov.

 

 


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Starting NOW: Live Pillars of Democracy Event

Starting NOW: Live Pillars of Democracy Event

Our Pillars of Democracy event on the federal judiciary is about to begin, at 4pm. Click here to start watching.

In this event, American Enterprise Institute scholar Adam White, Harvard Professor Randall Kennedy, and Boston College Professor Cathleen Kaveny will participate in a panel discussion, moderated by Russell Wheeler of the Brookings Institution, on the causes of changing attitudes towards the federal judiciary, as well as the ways that the third branch of government can win Americans’ trust back.

Read our blog post on the issues facing the judiciary to get some background on the issues that will be discussed.

With Pillars of Democracy, the Kluge Center, in partnership with the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute, brings scholars together to examine the bedrock institutions of American life and to try to understand how those institutions have lost the respect and confidence of the American people.


News from the John W. Kluge Center:This Thursday: Pillars of Democracy on the Federal Judiciary

This Thursday: Pillars of Democracy on the Federal Judiciary

There’s still time to register for the next Pillars of Democracy event, happening live on Thursday, September 30, at 4pm. Register for free here.

With Pillars of Democracy, the Kluge Center, in partnership with the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute, brings scholars together to examine the bedrock institutions of American life and to try to understand how those institutions have lost the respect and confidence of the American people.

Perhaps no institution serves as a better example of changing attitudes towards US institutions than the judiciary, and specifically the Supreme Court. Increasingly, justices are viewed through a lens of partisanship or ideology, and they are seen as interested in achieving the policy goals of their side rather than as disinterested legal thinkers.

In this event, hosted on Zoom on September 30 at 4pm, American Enterprise Institute scholar Adam White, Harvard Professor Randall Kennedy, and Boston College Professor Cathleen Kaveny will participate in a panel discussion, moderated by Russell Wheeler of the Brookings Institution, on the causes of changing attitudes towards the federal judiciary, as well as the ways that the third branch of government can win Americans’ trust back. Don’t forget to register!


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Reminder: Applications Are Open for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation

Reminder: Applications Are Open for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation

Applications are open for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation until October 15.

A partnership between NASA’s Astrobiology Program and the Library of Congress, the Blumberg Chair, an annually selected position, supports a scholar in the sciences, social sciences, or the humanities to take up residence in the Library’s John W. Kluge Center. 

Completed applications are due by October 15, 2021. For further information please consult our website.

The Blumberg Chair creates an opportunity to research the range and complexity of societal issues related to how life begins and evolves, and to examine philosophical, religious, literary, ethical, legal, cultural and other concerns arising from scientific research on the origin, evolution, and nature of life.

Within the parameters of NASA’s mission, a chair might also seek to investigate how innovative quests for fundamental understanding may lead to major developments for the betterment of society. Barry Blumberg, for whom the Chair is named, conducted groundbreaking research addressing a simple but fundamental question: Why do some people get sick while others, exposed to the same environment, remain healthy? That this work unexpectedly led to the discovery of the hepatitis B virus, the development of a vaccine, and the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine illustrates the potential for unconventional thinking about fundamental questions to yield great rewards. Using methodologies from the history and sociology of science, the philosophy of science, legal, political, and cultural history, and other disciplines, a Chair might study and tell the story of how a basic research initiative led to completely unexpected discoveries and applications.

Visit our website to find more information on the chair position and on how to apply.


September News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

2021 National Book Festival Starts Tomorrow!


News from the John W. Kluge Center: TOMORROW: Why has the trust in the presidency fallen so far?

TOMORROW: Why has the trust in the presidency fallen so far?

The Kluge Center’s second event in the Pillars of Democracy, focusing on the presidency, is live tomorrow, August 19, at 4pm.

Registration is open now.

Debates about the proper scope of presidential power have been with us since the beginning. Since 1789, the actions of presidents have raised questions about centralized power and the constitutional balance among the branches of government. Still, the president and the institution of the presidency have typically commanded a high level of respect from Americans, if not political agreement. 

But recently, as with many other American institutions, trust in the presidency is increasingly determined by partisan identification, and the office is regarded as little more than a means to an end. Join the Kluge Center, the Brookings Institution, and the American Enterprise Institute for an event analyzing the presidency, how it got where it is today, and how its status might be restored.

Register now to be sure to catch this event live.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Applications Are Open for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation

Applications Are Open for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to announce that applications are now open for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation.

A partnership between NASA’s Astrobiology Program and the Library of Congress, the Blumberg Chair, an annually selected position, supports a scholar in the sciences or the humanities to take up residence in the Library’s John W. Kluge Center. 

Completed applications are due by October 15, 2021. For further information please consult our website.

The Blumberg Chair creates an opportunity to research the range and complexity of societal issues related to how life begins and evolves, and to examine philosophical, religious, literary, ethical, legal, cultural and other concerns arising from scientific research on the origin, evolution, and nature of life.

Within the parameters of NASA’s mission, a chair might also seek to investigate how innovative quests for fundamental understanding may lead to major developments for the betterment of society. Barry Blumberg, for whom the Chair is named, conducted groundbreaking research addressing a simple but fundamental question: Why do some people get sick while others, exposed to the same environment, remain healthy? That this work unexpectedly led to the discovery of the hepatitis B virus, the development of a vaccine, and the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine illustrates the potential for unconventional thinking about fundamental questions to yield great rewards. Using methodologies from the history and sociology of science, the philosophy of science, legal, political, and cultural history, and other disciplines, a Chair might study and tell the story of how a basic research initiative led to completely unexpected discoveries and applications.

Visit our website to find more information on the chair position and on how to apply.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: In the Know #13: The Newsletter of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress

In the Know #13: The Newsletter of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress

We at the Kluge Center would like to thank all of you, our supporters and friends, for your continued support and engagement through these difficult pandemic times. We hope that you are beginning to see changes around you that inspire hope for the future. This newsletter will continue providing regular updates on the Kluge Center’s activities, including our events, fellowship competitions, and blog posts. Please share this newsletter with anyone who might be interested in following Kluge, applying for fellowships, or viewing our events. Our dedication to bringing you the highest quality conversations on important public issues and scholarship will continue. Let’s keep the conversation going.

John Haskell, Director of the Kluge Center

 

The Pillars of Democracy

The Kluge Center held the first event in a new series, the Pillars of Democracy, on July 8. The recording of the live event, focusing on Congress, is now available. We are partnering with the American Enterprise Institute and the Brookings Institution for this endeavor. This series  examines central institutions in American society, and tries to understand why they are experiencing such a crisis of legitimacy. The next event, on August 19, will look at the presidency, and registration is open now.  Click here for more information and the schedule of events.

 

Kluge Kudos

We are proud of our alumni and their continuing work. In this section, you will find links to scholarly articles of interest by and featuring Kluge alumni, as well as awards, publications, events, and other accomplishments.  If you have suggestions for  featured items (subject to Library of Congress policy), please send them to scholarly@loc.gov for consideration. Please do not provide links to book reviews or sales sites, per Library of Congress policy.

 

Aynne Kokas (Kluge Fellow) testified for the United States International Trade Commission Hearing on July 1 on the business, trade, and economic effects of foreign censorship on US businesses. She was also quoted in the article “Chinese LGBT shutdown ‘may be result of backlash against Western influence’” published in the South China Morning Post. Last, she was recently mentioned in the article “Facebook’s Super Spreaders” published in The Wire China, which covers China’s relationship with Facebook and questions what message Beijing is trying to send with this relationship.

 

Bruce Jentleson (Kissinger Chair) wrote for Foreign Policy about the dangers of over-inflating the threat posed by China.

 

Michelle Jurkovich (Kluge Fellow) was interviewed on Duke University’s The Leading Voices in Food podcast on the global problem of hunger and her book "Feeding The Hungry: Advocacy and Blame in the Global Fight Against Hunger."

 

Philippa Koch (Larson Fellow) published the book “The Course of God’s Providence: Religion, Health, and the Body in Early America,” an exploration of the doctrine of providence—a belief in a divine plan for the world—and its manifestations in eighteenth-century America, from its origins as a consoling response to sickness to how it informed the practices of Protestant activity in the Atlantic world.

 

Alumni Spotlight

Rachel Shelden

Kluge Fellow, 2015-2016

 

What was most valuable about your time at the Kluge Center?

My time at the Kluge Center was incredibly valuable, both in connecting with such a wonderful community of scholars and in the resources that I was able to access at the Library of Congress. Many of the conversations I had while at the Library of Congress helped to shape the direction of my book project, but they also exposed me to an array of other fields and disciplines that I do not normally engage with. While at the Kluge Center, I spent the majority of my research time in the manuscript reading room, which is an unparalleled place to work, not only because of the resources but because of the staff as well.

 

Could you give a brief update on where you are now?

In 2019 I joined the faculty at Penn State and became the director of the Richards Civil War Era Center, which promotes rigorous scholarship on the intersection of slavery, race, and democracy through publications, postdoctoral fellowships, and workshops. I'm currently working on a book about the political world of Supreme Court justices in the nineteenth century that is under contract with UNC Press. I've talked and written a little bit about this project over the past year, including a piece for the Washington Post Outlook Section: "The Supreme Court Used to Be Openly Political. It traded partisanship for power."

You can find me on Twitter (@rachelshelden) and my website (rachelshelden.com). The Richards Center also publishes newsletters and other updates on our website: richardscenter.psu.edu.

 

Open Applications

Applications are now open for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration, and Scientific Innovation. This position represents an opportunity for high-level scholarship to understand the interface between human society and the scientific exploration of the cosmos. In the spirit of Barry Blumberg, whose life and work spanned multiple disciplines, the Blumberg Program is interested in the concept of exploration broadly defined to include any aspect of space exploration within the parameters of NASA’s mission to “reveal the unknown for the benefit of humankind.” The program is most interested in proposals that consider the philosophical, humanistic, legal, ethical, and policy dimensions of exploration.

 

Blog Posts

In an interview, former Kluge Fellow Katie Booth reflected on the legacy of Alexander Graham Bell in the deaf community, the topic of her recently published book. Other posts discussed some of the points raised in the event Social Movements and American Democracy in the 21st century, and  shared the details for the first Pillars of Democracy event.

 

Events

Kluge Fellow Katie Booth discussed her book on the troubled legacy of Alexander Graham Bell in the deaf community. Scholars Council member Theda Skocpol moderated a panel discussion of the current trends in the social movements that are shaping American society. Distinguished Visiting Scholar Jesse J. Holland and Staff Fellow Megan Halsband discussed the Library’s collection of genre comics. Our new Pillars of Democracy Series launched with a first event on the US Congress, featuring Frances Lee and Sarah Binder, both of whom recently held chair positions at Kluge.

 

Did You Know? Interesting Facts About the Kluge Center

Did you know there have been 46 different chair and fellowship appointments in the Kluge Center’s history?

 

Social Media:

Be sure to follow our Twitter account to get all the latest on our blog posts, open applications, and any future events.

 

We Want to Hear From You:

Do you have thoughts on what would make an interesting blog post? Submissions for the Kluge Kudos and Media Mentions section? What about an idea for event programming? Please reply to this email or contact scholarly@loc.gov.

 


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Watch Now: The Persistent Challenge of US-China Tech

Watch Now: The Persistent Challenge of US-China Tech

Our panel discussion on the problem of US-China tech is now available! Watch here.

Conflict over technology has been a flashpoint in relations between the US and China in recent years. Apps like WeChat and TikTok, major companies like Facebook and Google, and even new technologies like 5G and advanced computer chips have been at the heart of international competition in recent years. While the new American presidential administration is unlikely to end that dynamic, President Biden may choose to handle it differently from his predecessor. Panelists highlight the main challenges that the administration will face and consider the possible decisions and outcomes.

Moderator:

Aynne Kokas is an associate professor of media studies at the University of Virginia and a senior faculty fellow at the Miller Center for Public Affairs. Kokas is a recent Kluge Fellow. Her multiple-award-winning first book, “Hollywood Made in China” (University of California Press, 2017) argues that Chinese investment and regulations have transformed the US commercial media industry. Her next book project “Data Trafficking: The United States, China, and the Global Battle for Data Security” examines the policy implications of the transfer of consumer data between the United States and China. Kokas' research has also appeared in Information, Communication, and Society, Journal of Asian Studies, PLOS One, and others. Kokas is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

 

Panelists:

Yaqiu Wang is a China researcher at Human Rights Watch, working on issues including internet censorship, freedom of expression, protection of civil society and human rights defenders, and women’s rights. Wang was born and grew up in China, and has a MA degree in International Affairs from George Washington University. Wang is a columnist for MSNBC. Her articles have also appeared in Foreign Policy, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and elsewhere. She has provided commentary to the BBC, CNN, the New York Times and others. Prior to joining Human Rights Watch, Wang worked for the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Wenhong Chen is an associate professor of media studies and sociology, the founding co-director of Center for Entertainment and Media Industries, and a Distinguished Scholar in the Robert Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas at Austin.  Dr. Chen earned her PhD in sociology from the University of Toronto in Canada and was a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at Duke University. Dr. Chen has more than 90 publications, including articles in top-ranked journals in the fields of communication and media studies, sociology, and management. Dr. Chen’s research has received awards from the Academy of Management, International Association of Chinese Management Research, American Sociological Association, International Communication Association, and National Communication Association. 

Adam Segal is the Ira A. Lipman chair in emerging technologies and national security and director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy program at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). An expert on security issues, technology development, and Chinese domestic and foreign policy, Segal was the project director for the CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force reports Innovation and “National Security: Keeping Our Edge” and “Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet.” His book “The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age” (PublicAffairs, 2016) describes the increasingly contentious geopolitics of cyberspace. His work has appeared in the Financial Times, the New York Times, Foreign Policy, the Wall Street Journal, and Foreign Affairs, among others. He currently writes for the blog, “Net Politics.”

Watch the full event here.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Register Now for The Pillars of Democracy: The Presidency

Register Now for The Pillars of Democracy: The Presidency

Registration is open for our second live Pillars of Democracy event, on the presidency. It will take place on August 19, live on Zoom at 4pm.

Debates about the proper scope of presidential power have been with us since the beginning. Since 1789, the actions of presidents have raised questions about centralized power and the constitutional balance among the branches of government. Still, the president and the institution of the presidency have typically commanded a high level of respect from Americans, if not political agreement.

But recently, as with many other American institutions, trust in the presidency is increasingly determined by partisan identification, and the office is regarded as little more than a means to an end. Join the Kluge Center, the Brookings Institution, and the American Enterprise Institute for an event analyzing the presidency, how it got where it is today, and how its status might be restored.

Register now to be sure to catch this event live.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Watch Now: Peculiar Pop and Comic Books at the Library of Congress

Our event looking at the Library’s collection of genre comics is now available. Watch here.

In it, Jesse J. Holland and Megan Halsband discuss the Library of Congress comics collection, as well as the place of comics in American culture.

Halsband, a Librarian in the Serial & Government Publications Division, completed a 2021 staff fellowship looking at the non-superhero genre collections at the Library of Congress, including western, romance, education and funny animal comics. Holland, in addition to his work in Black history and journalism, is the author of “Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther?” the first novel featuring the comic book character Black Panther and a comics enthusiast. 

The full event is available to watch now.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Watch Now: Social Movements and American Democracy in the 21st Century

The Kluge Center is pleased to announce that our latest event looking at recent social movements in the United States is now available to watch on the Library’s YouTube channel.

Grassroots organizing and collective action have always been fundamental to American democracy. Some recent struggles by Americans to make their voices heard have not resulted in the kinds of changes that participants hoped for. But some movements, both recently and further back in American history, have succeeded in changing our society and the way that we understand it.

What’s the difference between a movement that wins victories for its constituents, and one that fails? What are the factors that make collective action powerful? In this event, our panel of scholars of American politics, social movements, and civic participation discusses these questions, the state of social movements in the US today, and other trends related to the health of democracy in a troubled time.

Watch the full event now.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Watch Now: The Invention of Miracles with Katie Booth

Watch Now: The Invention of Miracles with Katie Booth

The John W. Kluge Center interview with author and former Kluge Fellow Katie Booth is now available to watch. Booth is the author of “The Invention of Miracles: Language, Power, and Alexander Graham Bell's Quest to End Deafness,” a book that explores a lesser-known side to the legacy of the famous inventor of the telephone. Booth, who grew up in a mixed hearing and deaf family, looks at the history and impact of Bell’s attempts to discourage the use of American Sign Language and encourage speech by deaf people, an effort with a troubling and lasting legacy. 

Watch the full event here. For more, read our recent interview with Katie Booth.

Katie Booth teaches writing at the University of Pittsburgh. Her work has appeared in The Believer, Catapult, and Harper’s Magazine, and has been highlighted on Longreads and Longform; “The Sign for This” was a notable essay in the 2016 edition of Best American Essays. Booth is a former Kluge Fellow and worked on “The Invention of Miracles” during that fellowship.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Only a few days left before our July 15 fellowship deadline!

The Kluge Center would like to remind all applicants to the Kluge Fellowship, the Kluge Fellowship in Digital Studies, the David B. Larson Fellowship in Health and Spirituality, and the Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship for the Study of the Alan Lomax Collection that the deadline is July 15, 2021. This consolidated deadline is new for 2021, so please note the date.

The Kluge Center offers residential fellowships to scholars and thought leaders to make use of the Library’s vast collections and digital resources. Read more below, and click on the fellowship title for application information on the Kluge Center’s website.

Kluge Fellowship

The Kluge Center encourages research in the humanities and social sciences that makes use of the Library's large and varied collections. Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural research is particularly welcome in the Kluge Fellowship program. The fellowship is open to scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and related fields with special consideration given to those whose projects demonstrate relevance to contemporary challenges.

 

Kluge Fellowship in Digital Studies

The Kluge Fellowship in Digital Studies provides an opportunity for scholars  who utilize digital methods to make use of the Library’s large and varied digital collections and resources and curatorial expertise, and join an emerging community of digital scholarship practitioners. Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural research is particularly welcome in the Kluge Digital Studies program. The fellowship is open to scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and related fields with special consideration given to those whose projects demonstrate relevance to contemporary challenges.

 

David B. Larson Fellowship in Health and Spirituality

The David B. Larson Fellowship provides an opportunity for qualified scholars to apply for a post-doctoral fellowship in the field of health and spirituality. The fellowship is designed to continue Dr. Larson's legacy of promoting meaningful scholarly study of health and spirituality, two important and increasingly interrelated fields. It seeks to encourage the pursuit of scholarly excellence in the scientific study of the relation of religiosity and spirituality to physical, mental, and social health.

 

Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship for the Study of the Alan Lomax Collection

The John B. Lovelace Fellowship provides an opportunity for qualified scholars to apply for a post-doctoral fellowship for advanced research based on the Alan Lomax Collection. The Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship supports scholarly research that contributes significantly to a greater understanding of the work of Alan Lomax and the cultural traditions he documented over the course of a vigorous and highly productive 70-year career.

 

Applications will be accepted up to 11:59pm, July 15, 2021 for each of these fellowship programs. Please click here to visit our application portal to begin your application!

More information for each of these fellowship programs, including requirements and eligibility information, can be found here. Be sure to check our website for other fellowship opportunities throughout the year.

Please email scholarly@loc.gov with any questions about these fellowship opportunities or the application process.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: In the Know #12: The Newsletter of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of CongressA

In the Know #12: The Newsletter of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress 

We at the Kluge Center would like to thank all of you, our supporters and friends, for your continued support and engagement as we pulled through this past pandemic year together. We hope that you are beginning to see changes around you that inspire hope for the future. This newsletter will continue providing regular updates on the Kluge Center’s activities, including our events, fellowship competitions, and blog posts. Please share this newsletter with anyone who might be interested in following or viewing Kluge events. Our dedication to bringing you the highest quality conversations on important public issues and scholarship will continue. Let’s keep the conversation going.

John Haskell, Director of the Kluge Center

 

Our Common Purpose

We concluded the Our Common Purpose series of events hosted by Kluge Prize winner Danielle Allen, with the third event, Finding a Shared Historical Narrative. All videos and blog posts for these events can be found on our blog.

 

The Pillars of Democracy

The Kluge Center announced a new event series, the Pillars of Democracy, beginning on July 8. We are partnering with the American Enterprise Institute and the Brookings Institution for this endeavor. This series will look at the central institutions in American society, and try to understand why they are experiencing such a crisis of legitimacy. The July 8 event will look at the US Congress, and registration is open now.  Click here for more information and the schedule of events.

 

Kluge Kudos

We at the Kluge Center are proud of our alumni and their continuing work. We provide these links to scholarly articles of interest by Kluge alumni to other interested alumni.  If you have any suggestions for potential links (subject to Library of Congress policy at https://www.loc.gov/legal/comment-and-posting-policy/?loclr=eanfwk), please send them to scholarly@loc.gov for consideration. Please do not provide links to book reviews or sales sites, per Library of Congress policy.

Constanze Stelzenmüller (Kissinger Chair) wrote an article for the Brookings Institution titled, “Nord Stream 2 impasse threatens trans-Atlantic ties.” The article explains how the Nord Stream natural gas pipeline might affect relationships among several countries. Also, Stelzenmüller moderated a panel discussion for the seventh annual Justice Stephen Breyer Lecture on International Law about Defending democracy against its adversaries. She was also named the inaugural holder of the Fritz Stern Chair and participated in a related event.

Susan Schneider (Astrobiology Chair) founded the Center for the Future Mind at Florida Atlantic University. The Center for the Future Mind explores scientific and philosophical innovations to achieve a richer understanding of emerging technologies and the future of the mind.

Aynne Kokas (Kluge Fellow) commented in a Washington Post piece on China not showing the Oscars live. In a Nikkei Asia article on how anti-Asian attacks have eroded the US's image abroad, she is quoted saying that "there's not enough effort to distinguish between the behaviors and policies of the Chinese government and the Chinese people in China, as well as Chinese Americans in the United States." And she is quoted in a South China Morning Post piece on how Chinese movies have struggled to find audiences overseas. Kokas co-wrote an article titled, “China-Born Chloe Zhao Sought Common Ground in Oscars Speech,” in Nikkei Asia. She testified at a hearing titled U.S.-China Relations: Improving U.S. Competitiveness Through Trade held by The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance. She was mentioned in several articles: Oscar Winner Chloé Zhao Becomes Lightning Rod in US-China Relationship, Says Media Professor, This Year’s Oscars Most Diverse Ever | Voice of America – English, China and Hollywood: The End of the Affair. She appeared on the Wilson Center’s Need to Know podcast. In addition, Kokas was selected as a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

David Baron (Astrobiology Chair) gave a virtual talk hosted by La Sierra University in Southern California. The speech focused on his previous books and his research at the Library of Congress.

Carla P. Freeman (US-China Relations Chair) won The China Quarterly's 2020 Gordon White Prize for her article titled, "An Uncommon Approach to the Global Commons: Interpreting China's Divergent Positions on Maritime and Outer Space Governance." Freeman, whose research and teaching focuses on Chinese foreign policy, examines China's approach to the global commons—those areas throughout the globe over which no country has sovereignty and that are accessible to all, such as the maritime and outer space commons.

Jemima Paine (Arts and Humanities Research Council Fellow) is involved in organizing a conference at the British Library called National Libraries Now. The aim of the conference is to bring together library professionals working directly with collections in national libraries to share current practice and new approaches to curatorship.

 

Open Applications

We have extended the deadline for the Article One Fellowship to July 15. Click here for application information and here for the application itself. This is a post-doctoral fellowship to support research on key topics, including: the separation of powers, the role of constituent voice in policymaking, diversity and representation in the legislative branch, and institutional reforms to increase congressional capacity.

The Kluge Fellowship remains open until July 15. Click here for more information and here for the application.

 

Blog Posts

Lee Ann Potter, of the the Library of Congress Center for Learning, Literacy, & Engagement, interviewed Rodrigo Corral, designer of the poster for the Our Common Purpose series as well as many recognizable book covers. Past holders of the Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations shared their reflections on the 20th anniversary of the chair’s establishment. Kislak Chair Louise Burkhart was interviewed on her work with Nahuatl Passion plays. We looked at some of the key points from the Our Common Purpose event on American identity, and considered What Makes Americans American? The Kluge Center also announced new chairs in residence for 2021.

 

Events

Materials scientist Ainissa Ramirez joined us for an interview on the way that inventions and innovations in science and materials have shaped our lives. Experts discussed the state of Middle Eastern politics in 2021. Kislak Chair Simon Martin spoke about politics among the ancient Maya. Charlie Laderman, a recent Kluge scholar, was interviewed on his book: “Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention, and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order.”

 

Did You Know? Interesting Facts About the Kluge Center

Did you know that Kluge Center scholars have been associated with more than 500 different institutions from all over the world?

 

Social Media:

Be sure to follow our Twitter account to get all the latest on our blog posts, open applications, and any future events.

 

We Want to Hear From You:

Do you have thoughts on what would make an interesting blog post? Submissions for the Kluge Kudos and Media Mentions section? What about an idea for event programming? Please reply to this email or contact scholarly@loc.gov.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: There's Still Time to Apply for the Article One Fellowship Studying Congress

Designed for scholars in the first 7 years post-PHD, and made possible by the generous support of Democracy Fund, theArticle One Fellowshipwill support research on key topics in the study of the US Congress. The application form can be found here:https://www.loc.gov/static/programs/john-w-kluge-center/chairs-fellowships/fellowships/article-one/ArticleOneApp.pdf?loclr=eanfwk

Scholars who have received a terminal advanced degree within the past seven years in the humanities, social sciences, or in a professional field such as law are eligible.

Scholars who have not yet completed their dissertation are also eligible, provided they have received the PhD before the fellowship appointment begins. Applicants may be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals. While awards will be made this fiscal year, awardees may complete their fellowships during any time from Fall 2021 through 2022.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Watch now: "Sharing the Burden" with Charlie Laderman

You can now watch the Kluge Center’s new author conversation with Charlie Laderman, a recent Kluge scholar, on his book: “Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention, and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order,” now available on the Library of Congress YouTube channel. In “Sharing the Burden,” Laderman looks at the Armenian struggle for survival in the early 20th century, and the way that it forced the US to consider its role as an international power in a new way.

Laderman is a Lecturer in International History and part of the core team responsible for directing the Centre for Grand Strategy at King’s College London. Laderman did much of his research for the book at the Library of Congress when he was a fellow with the UK’s AHRC in 2010 and then again in 2015.

Click here to learn about the Kluge Center’s new event series, The Pillars of Democracy, looking at the foundational institutions in American life.

Also, be sure to follow Insights, the Kluge Center’s blog, to find out the latest on our events and scholars. 


June News from the Library of Congress

News from the Library of Congress

Celebrating Juneteenth, Pride Month, & More!


News from the John W. Kluge Center: You can now watch "Trump Legacies, Biden Challenges: The Middle East in 2021"

You can now watch the Kluge Center’s event Trump Legacies, Biden Challenges: The Middle East in 2021.

This event is a panel discussion of current events in the Middle East led by moderator and Kluge Center Scholars Council Member Lisa Anderson and featuring Tamara Wittes, Rabab El Mahdi, and Mehran Kamrava. Participants considered the complex interconnection between US foreign policy and ongoing diplomacy and conflict in the region.

Watch the full event now. And click here to learn about the Kluge Center’s new event series, The Pillars of Democracy, looking at the foundational institutions in American life.

Also, be sure to follow Insights, the Kluge Center’s blog, to find out the latest on our events and scholars. 


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Article One Fellowship Deadline Has Been Extended

The deadline for the Kluge Center's Article One Fellowship Program has been extended by an additional month, to July 15th, 2021. Designed for scholars in the first 7 years post-PHD, and made possible by the generous support of Democracy Fund, the Article One Fellowship will support research on key topics in the study of the US Congress. The application form can be found here:

https://www.loc.gov/static/programs/john-w-kluge-center/chairs-fellowships/fellowships/article-one/ArticleOneApp.pdf?loclr=eanfwk


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Reminder - Article One Fellowship Now Open For Applications

Reminder: Article One Fellowship Now Open For Applications

The John W. Kluge Center is currently accepting applications for the Library of Congress Article One Fellowship. The fellowship will support work on the role of Congress in the U.S. government. Click here for more information and for application instructions. Applications will be open until June 15, 2021.

Fellowship description: The strength of the American federal system is dependent on the vitality of the first branch, the U.S. Congress. In an effort to support scholarship on Congress’s role in the system, the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress invites qualified scholars to apply for a post-doctoral fellowship to support research on key topics, including: the separation of powers, the role of constituent voice in policymaking, diversity and representation in the legislative branch, and institutional reforms to increase congressional capacity.

This fellowship is made possible by generous support from the Democracy Fund.

Scholars who have received a terminal advanced degree within the past seven years in the humanities, social sciences, or in a professional field such as law are eligible. Applicants may be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals.

If you have any questions, please contact scholarly@loc.gov.


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Watch Now: Simon Martin on Ancient Maya Politics

You can now watch the Kluge Center’s Dan Turello in conversation with recent Jay I. Kislak Chair for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas. In the event, Martin and Turello talk about ancient Maya politics in the context of Martin’s 2020 book “Ancient Maya Politics: A Political Anthropology of the Classic Period 150–900 CE.”

Martin has taken the lead in understanding the politics of the Classic Maya (150-900 A.D.) based on deciphering their hieroglyphic script. Much of this work focuses on the complex hierarchies between individual kings and the ideology that enabled and sustained that order.

Watch the full event now. And click here to learn about the Kluge Center’s new event series, The Pillars of Democracy, looking at the foundational institutions in American life.

Also, be sure to follow Insights, the Kluge Center’s blog, to find out the latest on our events and scholars.  


News from the John W. Kluge Center: Announcing The Pillars of Democracy Event Series

The major institutions in American society are in a moment of crisis. From the branches of government to religious and civic organizations, the media, and political parties, these key foundations of American life are less respected, less trusted, and less involved in forming the character of individuals than at any point in our history.

The John W. Kluge Center, with the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute, will host the Pillars of Democracy series to explore how institutions work in a functioning society, and grapple with the question of how their decline can be counteracted. These panel discussions will draw on the expertise of a wide range of diverse participants: historians, political scientists, authors, and others from across the ideological spectrum and from a variety of backgrounds, who will help create a full picture of the challenges facing American institutions, and their potential promise.

The Pillars of Democracy series will consist of a series of ten events, held once a month from July 2021 to May 2022. The series begins on July 8 with an analysis of the US Congress.

Each event will focus on one institution, with panelists answering the questions: “What is the institution’s proper role? Where does it fall short? And what can we do about it?”

Event Schedule:

  1. The US Congress – July 8, 2021
  2. The Presidency — August 19, 2021
  3. The Federal Judiciary — September 16, 2021
  4. The Regulatory State — October 21, 2021
  5. Political Parties November — November 18, 2021
  6. Electoral Institutions — January 20, 2021
  7. The Military — February 17, 2022
  8. Churches and Other Civic Institutions — March 17, 2022
  9. The Media — April 21, 2022
  10. Universities and the Academy — May 19, 2022

 

First event: The US Congress - July 8, 2021

Click here for free registration.

Moderator:

John Haskell, Director of the John W. Kluge Center.

 

Panelists: 

Frances Lee is a professor of political science at Princeton University, 2019 Library of Congress Chair in Congressional Policymaking. Lee is the author of Insecure Majorities: Congress and the Perpetual Campaign (2016), Beyond Ideology: Politics, Principles and Partisanship in the U.S. Senate (2009), and coauthor of Sizing Up The Senate: The Unequal Consequences of Equal Representation (1999). Lee is the recipient of the American Political Science Association’s Richard F. Fenno Award, the D.B. Hardeman Award from the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation, and the American Political Science Association’s E.E. Schattschneider award.

Sarah Binder is the most recent Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance, Professor of Political Science at George Washington University, and senior fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. An expert in Congress and legislative politics, her current research explores the historical and contemporary relationship between Congress and the Federal Reserve. Her co-authored book, The Myth of Independence: How Congress Governs the Federal Reserve was published by Princeton University Press in 2017. She is associate editor of The Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Philip Wallach is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he studies America’s separation of powers, with a focus on regulatory policy issues and the relationship between Congress and the administrative state.

Before joining AEI, Dr. Wallach was a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, where he authored “To the Edge: Legality, Legitimacy, and the Responses to the 2008 Financial Crisis” (Brookings Institution Press, 2015). He was later affiliated with the R Street Institute and served as a fellow with the House Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress in 2019.

 

This series of events is co-sponsored by the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute.

Any views expressed by the panelists are solely their own, and do not necessarily reflect the policies or positions of the Library of Congress, the American Enterprise Institute, or the Brookings Institution.

The Brookings Institution is a nonprofit organization devoted to independent research and policy solutions. Its mission is to conduct high-quality, independent research and, based on that research, to provide innovative, practical recommendations for policymakers and the public.

The American Enterprise Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy research organization where scholars work to expand liberty, increase individual opportunity and strengthen free enterprise.


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Obama just called Biden's Build Back Better a 'giant leap forward' that will bring affordable childcare and universal preschool to millions of Americans

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An exposA(c) detailing the CIAas war on WikiLeaks - a Trump administration plan to silence Julian Assange and the organisation - has been published. But like so much of the Assange story, it's got nothing like the media coverage it deserves. Contributors: Michael Isikoff - Chief investigative correspondent, Yahoo News Kevin Gosztola - Managing editor, Shadowproof.com Carrie DeCell - Staff attorney, Knight First Amendment Institute Rebecca Vincent - Director of international campaigns & UK bureau director, Reporters Without Borders On our radar: Project Amplify - Facebookas PR initiative - backfires. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Meenakshi Ravi about the scrutiny Facebook is under, yet again. Lost in translation: How texts change as they travel The translation of literature - from one language to another - is a tricky business. Translators become cultural mediators, balancing faithfulness to the original with the needs of a new audience. When translators fail, context can be sacrificed, and stereotypes can get reinforced. Contributors: Layla AlAmmar - Author, Silence is a Sense & Academic, University of Lancaster Susan Bassnett - Translation theorist & emeritus professor, University of Warwick Muhammad Ali Mojaradi - Translator & founder, @persianpoetics Leri Price - Literary translator End Note: And, after 16 years of leading the country as its chancellor, Germany is saying goodbye to Angela Merkel. Puppet Regime - a comedy series produced and published by GZERO Media - pays tribute to her work, Kraftwerk style.

Drone exposA(c): The journalism that forced the Pentagonas mea culpa | The Listening Post

United States drone warfare is finally being exposed. But why did it take American news outlets so long to get to such a big story? Contributors: Emran Feroz, Founder, Drone Memorial Christine Fair, Security Studies Program, Georgetown University Spencer Ackerman, Author, Reign of Terror Vanessa Gezari, National Security Editor, The Intercept On our radar: Producer Tariq Nafi and host Richard Gizbert discuss a voting app that was developed by Russian opposition activists to fight Vladimir Putin in the recent elections - but was censored by Big Tech. 100 Years Too Late: Canadaas Residential School Reckoning Months after the story of mass graves at so-called residential schools in Cananda broke, the nation is still reckoning with the trauma of mass graves. Contributors: Cheryl McKenzie, Director of News and Current Affairs, Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) Cindy Blackstock, Executive Director, First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada Connie Walker, Host, Stolen: The Search for Jermain Wab Kinew, Leader, Manitoba New Democratic Party

China: Regulating superstars, superfans and big tech | The Listening Post

Xi Jinping's China has embarked on a campaign that could transform the country's technology, entertainment and media industries. Contributors: Chris Buckley - China correspondent, The New York Times Kaiser Kuo - Host, The Sinica Podcast and editor-at-large, SupChina Bingchun Meng - Associate professor, Department of Media and Communications, LSE Rui Zhong - Program associate, Wilson Center, Kissinger Institute on China and the United States On our radar A month of Taliban rule in Afghanistan, Meenakshi Ravi and producer Johanna Hoes discuss how the Taliban is already leaving its mark on the countryas news industry despite initial promises to the contrary. Structures of oppression? Colombiaas falling statues Indigenous Colombians have been toppling statues of European colonisers - challenging how the countryas history is remembered. Contributors: Didier Chirimuscay - Misak community leader Rodolfo Segovia - President, Colombian Academy of History Amada Carolina Perez - Historian, Javeriana University

Reporting the aenda of the Afghan war 20 years after 9/11 | The Listening Post

Two decades on from the 9/11 attacks, American news coverage of the United States' withdrawal from Afghanistan reveals how much has changed - and how much has not - in the mediaas approach to US wars. Contributors: Alexander Hainy-Khaleeli - Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies, University of Exeter Catherine Lutz - co-director, Costs of War project; professor of International Studies, Brown University Fariba Nawa - author, Opium Nation; host, On Spec Azmat Khan - contributing writer, The New York Times Magazine; assistant professor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism On our radar: Meenakshi Ravi speaks to producer Flo Phillips about the latest developments in the Afghan media space, including the Talibanas mistreatment of journalists covering this weekas protests. Afghan journalists under threat A report on the past, present and future of the media in Afghanistan, as told by three Afghan journalists. Contributors: aNa - Journalist & media safety specialist aMa - Photojournalist aLa - Regional radio & TV reporter

The Forever War: 20 Years After 9/11 | The Listening Post

Twenty years after the 9/11 attacks, this special edition of The Listening Post looks at the climate of fear that undergirded the so-called "War on Terror" and how the US news and entertainment industries helped produce it. Contributors: - Chris Hedges - Former foreign correspondent for The New York Times; author of Collateral Damage - Sinan Antoon - Co-editor at Jadaliyya; poet and writer; associate professor at New York University - Jill Abramson - Former executive editor of The New York Times - Deepa Kumar - author of Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire; associate professor at Rutgers University - Robert D Kaplan - Former contributing editor at The Atlantic - Lexi Alexander - Movie and TV director

Pegasus: Flying on the wings of Israeli acyber-tech diplomacya? | The Listening Post

A global cyber-surveillance scandal - spyware developed in Israel - has put the government there under the media microscope, and its story does not add up. Contributors: Jonathan Klinger - Cyberlaw lawyer Marc Owen Jones - Assistant professor, Hamid Bin Khalifa University Omer Benjakub - Tech & Cyber Reporter, Haaretz Marwa Fatafta - Policy Analyst, Al Shabaka On our radar: Tunisia is in political turmoil after the president declared a state of emergency - or what critics are calling a coup. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Flo Phillips about how journalists there are feeling the heat. Africaas PR Push: How governments manage the message: Handling public relations for governments is lucrative work - and for Western PR firms, Africa has emerged as a new hunting ground. Contributors: Alex Magaisa - Former adviser, prime minister of Zimbabwe Alexander Dukalskis - Author, Making the World Safe for Dictatorship Kathleen Ndongmo - Communications specialist

Pegasus Project: Malware used against journalists and dissidents | The Listening Post

A global consortium of media outlets blew the lid off a huge surveillance scandal revealing how the hacking tool Pegasus has been used by governments around the world to spy on dissidents and journalists via their mobile phones. Contributors: Rohini Singh - Reporter, The Wire Bradley Hope - Co-founder, Project Brazen Laurent Richard - Founder, Forbidden Stories Eva Galperin - Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation On our radar: American media outlets have been feasting on a story a the billionaire space race. Richard Gizbert and producer Meenakshi Ravi discuss how the mass of coverage squares alongside another story about the planet that is far more consequential - climate change. Bild's battle for political influence in Germany There is a crucial election coming in Germany, and its biggest tabloid, Bild, is trying to preserve its place at the heart of German politics. Contributors: Julian Reichelt - Editor-in-chief, Bild GA1/4nter Wallraff - Investigative journalist & author, The Lead Moritz Tschermak - Editor-in-chief, BILDblog & author, How Bild divides society with fear and hate Margreth LA1/4nenborg - Professor of journalism, Free University Berlin - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Cuba: Protesters move from social media to the streets | The Listening Post

Cuba is witnessing something historic - the biggest anti-government demonstrations in 60 years - and the authorities have imposed temporary blocks on the internet, making credible media coverage and reliable information that much harder to find. Contributors: MA3nica Rivero Cabrera - Cuban journalist Tracey Eaton - Cuba Money Project Angelo R Guisado - Center for Constitutional Rights JosA(c) JasA!n Nieves - Editor-in-chief, El Toque On our radar: Whether they are taking penalty kicks or taking a knee, Black footballers playing for England are dealing with online abuse. Richard Gizbert and producer Tariq Nafi discuss the debate that has resulted - about racism in the United Kingdom. Sports activism in the era of social media On tennis and basketball courts, baseball fields and in hockey rinks, athletes are putting their political and social activism out there for sports fans to see. Contributors: Shireen Ahmed - Journalist & writer Musa Okwonga - Co-founder, Stadio Football & author, One of Them Frank Guridy - Associate professor, Columbia University Khalida Popal - Former captain, Afghanistanas womenas football team

Hong Kong: Broken promises | The Listening Post

Twenty-four years since Britain handed Hong Kong back to China, the city has undergone a transformation. In recent years, Beijing has intensified the silencing of political dissent and the squeezing of media freedom - through new laws drawn up in the name of security, the jailing of critics, and the reigning in of adversarial journalism. Contributors: Chris Yeung - Chairperson, Hong Kong Journalists Association Bao Choy - Freelance journalist, RTHK Linda Wong - Journalist, Citizen News Keith Richburg - Journalism and Media Studies Centre, Hong Kong University; president, Foreign Correspondents Club Holden Chow - Vice chairman, Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong Hong Kong: The assault on free speech Three Hong Kongers talk about the shrinking space for freedom in their city, and the way it has affected their lives and work. Contributors: Lee Cheuk-yan - Founder, June 4th Museum Wong Kei Kwan (Zunzi) - Political cartoonist Nathan Law - Democracy activist - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Iranas new president: What's next for the countryas media? | The Listening Post

Iranas new president-elect is heading into the job carrying some baggage from the past that neither he nor the countryas state-friendly news outlets care to talk about. Contributors: Mahsa Alimardani - Iran researcher, Article 19; researcher, Oxford Internet Institute Ghanbar Naderi - Iranian affairs analyst Pardis Shafafi - Anthropologist and researcher, ERC Off-Site Project Arash Azizi - Author of Shadow Commander On our radar Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Meenakshi Ravi about the targeting of female social media influencers in Egypt as two more women are jailed for their TikTok videos. The struggle for freedom of expression in post-Castro Cuba From protests to viral videos, Cuban activists test the limits of dissent as they demand greater cultural freedoms. Contributors: Amaury Pacheco - Poet and activist, Movimiento San Isidro Fernando Ravsberg - Journalist; former correspondent, BBC Fernando Rojas - Cuban Deputy Minister of Culture Marta Maria Ramirez - Independent journalist - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Nigeria: The tweet that got Twitter banned | The Listening Post

The tit-for-tat in Nigeria that saw Twitter banned by the government. Contributors: Mercy Abang - Journalist Lai Mohammed - Nigerian minister for information and culture Gbenga Sesan - Executive director, Paradigm Initiative Fisayo Soyombo - Editor-in-chief, Foundation for Investigative Journalism On our radar It's election time in Algeria and the government is feeling the heat on the streets. Richard Gizbert and producer Flo Phillips discuss its response - arresting journalists, and taking broadcasters off the air. A snapshot of empire: The racist legacy of colonial postcards How the golden age of postcards left behind a legacy of racism that continues to shape perceptions of Africans today. Contributors: Sarah Sentilles - Writer and critical theorist Olubukola Gbadegesin - Associate professor, Saint Louis University Stephen Hughes - Senior lecturer, SOAS Julie Crooks - Curator, Art Gallery of Ontario - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

From Sheikh Jarrah to Gaza: Journalism under apartheid | The Listening Post

Just days after the ceasefire in Gaza ended 11 days of bombing, The Listening Post spoke with two Palestinians who have tilted international attention towards their struggle. Contributors: Muna al-Kurd - Sheikh Jarrah resident and activist Hosam Salem - Gaza Palestinian photographer On our radar Richard Gizbert and producer Tariq Nafi discuss Israelas crackdown on reporters in East Jerusalem, and the international journalists calling out their own media operations for sanitising the oppression of Palestinians. How to cover apartheid: A human rights perspective with Hagai El-Ad Human rights groups are reframing the discussion about Israel's domination of Palestinians. Richard Gizbert interviews Hagai El-Ad, executive director of Israeli human rights organisation, BaTselem. Contributors: Hagai El-Ad - Executive director, BaTselem - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Lab leak reloaded: The media brings back COVID origin debate | The Listening Post

A year and a half into the pandemic and people are still asking where the COVID-19 virus originated. The so-called lab-leak theory is gaining momentum among some scientists and journalists who contend this story has the makings of a mass cover-up. Contributors: Nicholas Wade - Former science reporter, New York Times James Palmer - Deputy editor, Foreign Policy Amy Maxmen - Senior reporter, Nature Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz - Epidemiologist, University of Wollongong; columnist, The Guardian On our radar One journalist in Pakistan is beaten up. Another is being censored. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Tariq Nafi about the countryas red lines that you cannot cross. Forced to forget, determined to remember: The Tiananmen massacre Chinese officials have tried to erase the Tiananmen Square massacre from the countryas history but dissidents outside the mainland are doing what they can to keep the memory alive. Contributors: Lee Cheuk-yan - Founder, June 4th Museum; chairman, Hong Kong Alliance Wuaer Kaixi - Tiananmen protest leader Yaqiu Wang - China researcher, Human Rights Watch

Israel-Palestine: The double standard in American newsrooms | The Listening Post

News coverage in the US of the Palestine-Israel conflict has always favoured Israel but that is beginning to shift. The question is - to what extent and will it last? Contributors: Linda Sarsour - Executive director, MPower Change; Author, We Are Not Here to be Bystanders Omar Baddar - National Policy Council, Arab-American Institute Lara Friedman - President, Foundation for Middle East Peace Philip Weiss - Founder and senior editor, Mondoweiss On our radar Belarusian authorities went to extreme lengths to arrest opposition journalist Roman Protasevich. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Meenakshi Ravi to find out why. Slovenia: The prime ministeras awar with the mediaa Another European leader shows his authoritarian side; Sloveniaas prime minister, Janez JanA!a, says he is at "war with the media". Contributors: Marko MilosavljeviA - University of Ljubljana, Chair of Journalism AnuA!ka DeliA - Editor-in-chief, OA!tro BlaA3/4 Zgaga - Reporter, Nacional.hr and investigative journalist Boris TomaA!iA - Host and chief editor, Nova 24 - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Deadly Games: Algeria and Tunisia's ultra football fans | Al Jazeera World

"Somebody said that footballas a matter of life and death to you. I said, listen, it's more important than that." When the legendary Liverpool football manager Bill Shankly came out with his now-famous quote on TV in 1981, he might have been talking about the Algerian and Tunisian fans in this documentary. For many, football really is much more than a game. Some see themselves as not just supporters but part of a wider movement. They say that on the terraces, they find a sense of belonging and a camaraderie otherwise absent from their daily lives and that as supporters they also represent the dispossessed of the poor suburbs of Tunis and Algiers. Sometimes, however, football passions can have life-changing consequences. In March 2018, 19-year-old Omar Labidi from the southern suburbs of Tunis clashed with police outside a busy stadium. The victimas brother claims that police used tear gas to force Omar into a nearby river where he drowned. Three years after his death, his family continues to seek justice. In Algeria, Raouf Zerka has only vague memories of the game that changed his life in November 2016. In the 70th minute of a local derby match in Algiers, a burning flare hit him in the face. After eight days in a coma, he discovered he had lost his left eye. This film follows Tunisiaas and Algeriaas most passionate fans, buying tickets on the black market, travelling vast distances to away matches, and doing whatever it takes to support the teams they love. But it also highlights the price of football passion and asks if the cost of extreme fandoms is worth the risk.

Incite and inflame: Israelas manipulation of the media | The Listening Post

Ceasefire in Gaza: As journalists in the Strip stop to catch their breath, Israel's media stand accused of inciting violence against Palestinians. Contributors: Yara Hawari - Academic and writer; senior analyst, Al Shabaka Tareq Baconi - Senior analyst, International Crisis Group Joshua Leifer - Assistant editor, Jewish Currents Rami Younis - Palestinian journalist On our radar In Qatar, a Kenyan who blogged under the pen name "Noah" about his life as a migrant worker in the Arab Gulf state finds himself in custody. Richard Gizbert and producer Johanna Hoes discuss the case of Malcolm Bidali. The Xinjiang whitewash Meet the white Western influencers helping China contest claims of genocide in Xinjiang. Contributors: Mareike Ohlberg - Senior fellow (Asia Program), German Marshall Fund Sophie Richardson - China director, Human Rights Watch Amelia Pang - Author of Made in China Shelley Zhang - Writer, China Uncensored

#Palestine: Videos of violence, images of death on social media

Gaza under assault. Bloodshed at the Al-Aqsa Mosque. Social media is the place to go for the coverage of this story except when the platforms take issue with what is being posted. Contributors: Marwa Fatafta - Policy analyst, Al-Shabaka Yossi Mekelberg - Associate fellow of the MENA Programme, Chatham House Mariam Barghouti - Writer and activist Rami Khouri - Professor of journalism, American University of Beirut On our radar Three Myanmar journalists have been arrested in Thailand. Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Flo Phillips about their possible deportation back into the hands of Myanmaras military government. Mammy, Jezebel, Sapphire: Stereotyping Black women in media We discuss the stereotyping of Black women in the media and the push for change in an industry where diversity and inclusion have been too long in coming. Contributors: Kovie Biakolo - Culture writer and multiculturalism scholar Francesca Sobande - Lecturer of digital media studies, Cardiff University Naeemah Clark - Professor of cinema and television arts, Elon University; author, Diversity in US Mass Media Babirye Bukilwa - Actor and playwright - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

'Foreign agents and extremists': Russia's attack on critics | The Listening Post

In Russia, the political stakes are rising in the run up to election season - journalists are being branded as "foreign agents" and an opposition figure is labelled an "extremist". Contributors: Ilya Yablokov - Academic, Leeds University Lisa Alexandrova-Zorina - Journalist, Team 29 Ivan Kolpakov - Editor-in-chief, Meduza Uliana Pavlova - Journalist, Moscow Times On our radar After months of deliberation Donald Trumpas Facebook account remains suspended. Richard Gizbert asks producer Meenakshi Ravi to explain the decision. The Turks turning to YouTube Independent journalists in Turkey, like CA1/4neyt Azdemir, are taking refuge online. Azdemiras daily YouTube program has become a staple for Turks, especially among younger viewers looking for journalism of a different kind. Contributors: CA1/4neyt Azdemir - Creator and host, CA1/4neyt Azdemir Show Cansu Aamlibel - Editor-in-chief, Duvar English Emre Kizilkaya - Turkish vice chair, International Press Institute; author, The New Mainstream Media is Rising - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

India: Smothering critique amidst the second COVID wave | The Listening Post

While Indiaas healthcare system lies in total collapse, the government is leaning on social media companies to protect its own image. Contributors: Vineet Kumar - Author and media scholar Pratik Sinha - Co-founder, Alt News Pragya Tiwari - Political and cultural commentator Sangeeta Mahapatra - German Institute for Global and Area Studies On our radar Having imprisoned leading opposition figure Alexey Navalny, Russian authorities are now looking to put his entire organisation out of business. Producer Johanna Hoes tells Richard Gizbert why the group is being targeted by the state. Paul Rusesabagina: The trial of the 'hero of Hotel Rwanda' Dissident or "terrorist"? The many-sided story of hotel manager turned Hollywood hero, Paul Rusesabagina. Contributors: Michela Wrong - Author, Do Not Disturb Gatete Nyiringabo Ruhumuliza - Political analyst Tom Ndahiro - Genocide scholar Terry George - Director, Hotel Rwanda - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Indiaas COVID crisis: Navigating bad stats and government spin | The Listening Post

COVID-19 has brought India to its knees and, in many ways, the mainstream news media are failing to do their job. Contributors: Atul Chaurasia - Executive Editor, Newslaundry Paranjoy Guha Thakurta - Journalist & Author Sandhya Ravishankar - Journalist, India Ahead News Kapil Komireddi - Author, Malevolent Republic On our radar Host Richard Gizbert speaks to producer Flo Phillips about doctored footage coming out of Russia. Kremlin-backed channels would have you believe it is not just Ukrainian and Russian forces building up at the border but American as well. Attacked on the streets, typecast on TV: a media history of being Asian in America How Asian Americans have been othered in the media; the tropes and the rise in hate. Contributors: Kimmy Yam - Reporter, NBC News Takeo Rivera - Assistant Professor, Boston University Amanda Nguyen - Civil Rights Activist & Founder, Rise

Brazil: Battling Bolsonaroas COVID misinformation | The Listening Post

Some of Brazilas biggest media companies have come together to combat COVID-19 misinformation a a lot of which is coming from President Jair Bolsonaroas office. Contributors: Luciana Coelho - Head of COVID task force, Folha de Sao Paulo Cristina TardA!guila - Associate director, Poynter Laura GuimarAPSes CorrAaa - Associate professor, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais Marcelo Lins - Journalist, GloboNews On our radar Nicholas Muirhead and Richard Gizbert discuss a curious case of photo colourisation (and distortion) that has landed American media outlet Vice in hot water. Wikipedia: The internetas unlikeliest experiment turns 20 How has a free online encyclopedia built through crowdsourcing, open editing and volunteers managed to maintain its relevance and preserve its credibility? We look at what makes Wikipedia tick. Contributors: Katherine Maher - CEO, Wikimedia Foundation Sandister Tei - Co-founder, Wikimedia Ghana User Group Shane Greenstein - Professor, Harvard Business School

Unconventional journalists: From Tom Wolfe to Ghassan Kanafani | The Listening Post

This week, we are veering out of the mainstream and looking at journalism that broke the rules, pushed boundaries and, in some cases, redefined them. We explore the work and the legacy of three such innovators: Tom Wolfe, Ghassan Kanafani and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Their journalism defied convention and categorisation and continues to inspire people to consider new ways of presenting stories. Contributors: Dan Bischoff - Art critic, The Star-Ledger Emily Witt - Writer, The New Yorker Refqa Abu-Remaileh - Professor of modern Arabic literature and film, Free University Berlin Elias Khoury - Novelist and literary critic Asaad Abukhalil - Professor of political science, California State University Juanita LeA3n - Director, La Silla VacAa Jaime Abello Banfi - Director, The Gabo Foundation MarAa Jimena DuzA!n - Journalist and author - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Amazonas PR offensive: Taking on critics, unions and lawmakers | The Listening Post

Facing scrutiny over working conditions and a unionas drive to get employees organised, Amazonas PR pushback seems to be doing more harm than good. Contributors: Ken Klippenstein - Reporter, The Intercept Jonathan Capriel - Writer, Washington Business Journal Alex Press - Writer, Jacobin Magazine James Bloodworth - Author, Hired: Six Months Undercover in Low-Wage Britain On our radar The WHO released the findings of its investigation into the origins of the new coronavirus. Producer Meenakshi Ravi talks to Richard Gizbert about Western doubts on the credibility of the report and Beijingas grievances with the news coverage. Framing the self: The rise of the bookshelf aesthetic With so many pundits working from home, creating a backdrop has become an exercise in self-branding; bookshelves have become the background of choice. Contributors: Tamar Garb - Professor of art history, UCL Bernie Hogan - Senior research fellow, Oxford Internet Institute Hussein Kesvani - Culture and technology journalist Alex Christofi - Editorial director, Transworld Books - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Dazed & Confused: Reporting on Europeas troubled vaccine rollout | The Listening Post

Scientists say vaccines are our way out of this pandemic. But with trust in vaccination at an all-time low, the role of the messengers - politicians, pharmaceutical companies and the news media - is as important as ever. Contributors: Kai Kupferschmidt - Contributing correspondent, Science Magazine Hristio Boytchev - Germany correspondent, Research Europe Deborah Fuller - Professor, University of Washington School of Medicine Mun-Keat Looi - International features editor, The BMJ On our radar: The US government has launched a new vaccine campaign - producer Johanna Hoes talks to Richard Gizbert about the White Houseas use of Christian broadcasters, sports stars and a country music legend to convince conservative Americans that vaccination is in their best interests. From COVID conspiracism to vaccine hesitancy: Franceas other epidemic France is where lab vaccines were invented - so how did the French grow so sceptical, so reluctant to get the COVID jab? Contributors: Lucie Delaporte - Journalist, MA(c)diapart Richard SA(c)nA(c)joux - Senior reporter, TA(c)lA(c)rama Antoine Bristielle - Sociologist, Sciences Po & Researcher, Fondation Jean-JaurA"s - - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

High-risk news coverage: Reporting the crackdown in Myanmar | The Listening Post

As military leaders ban independent media and arrest reporters, citizen journalists become an information lifeline in Myanmar. Contributors: Swe Win - Editor-in-chief, Myanmar Now Aye Chan Naing - Chief editor, Democratic Voice of Burma Wai Hnin Pwint Thon - The Burma Campaign UK Wai Wai Nu - Human rights activist; founder, Women's Peace Network On our radar In Russia, opposition figure Alexey Navalney is locked up in prison. Producer Tariq Nafi talks to Richard Gizbert about how the part-politician, part-journalist is still managing to get the word out. The 'anti-woke' challengers looking to disrupt UK broadcast media To the right? Britain braces for two new broadcasters who are out to rebalance TV news. Contributors: Robin Aitken - Former BBC reporter; author, Can We Trust the BBC? Martin Fletcher - Former foreign editor, The Times Stewart Purvis - Former chief executive and editor-in-chief, ITN; former content and standards partner, Ofcom Ash Sarkar -A Contributing editor, Novara Media - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

Keyword Selected: sites

Privacy and Democracy in Technology

Streaming Audio Privacy-and-Democracy-in-Technology-AUDIO.mp3UVA Law professor Danielle Citron; Megan Gray of Gray Matters Law & Policy; and Rachel Levinson-Waldman of the Brennan Center for Justiceas Liberty & National Security Program discuss issues of democracy and technology in privacy. The event was sponsored by the LawTech Center, the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy, and Law, Innovation, Security & Technology.A


Military Justice in America

Streaming Audio Miliary-Justice_Judge-Margaret-Ryan.mp3Senior Judge Margaret Ryan of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces discusses her experiences and the military justice system, with UVA Law professor Thomas Nachbar serving as moderator. Nachbar is a judge advocate in the U.S. Army Reserve. The event was sponsored by the Federalist Society at UVA Law.


Innocence Project Client Emerson Stevens Shares His Story

Streaming Audio Wrongful-conviction-Emerson-Stevens.mp3Former Innocence Project client Emerson Stevens is joined by Juliet Hatchett a15, associate director of the Innocence Project Clinic, and Deirdre Enright a92, founding director of the Innocence Project at UVA Law, to discuss his experience being wrongfully convicted and his recent exoneration. Stevens served 32 years for a murder he did not commit before he was paroled in 2017, then pardoned in 2021.


The Civil Rights Movement and the Role of Race in the 1971 Virginia Constitution

Streaming Audio Law-Politics-9_30_21.mp3UVA Law professor Daniel Ortiz, Duke Law School professor H. Timothy Lovelace Jr. a06 and moderator Judge Lisa Lorish a08 of the Virginia Court of Appeals examine how the 1971 Virginia Constitution addressed race and responded to the civil rights movement.


The Transformation of International Tax

Streaming Audio Ruth_Mason-Chairlecture.mp3UVA Law professor Ruth Mason explains why the 2008 recession and the subsequent global effort to curb corporate tax dodging transformed international tax. The lecture marked her appointment as Edwin S. Cohen Distinguished Professor of Law and Taxation. Dean Risa Goluboff introduces Mason.


Roundup of the 2020 Supreme Court Term

Streaming Audio SCOTUS-roundup-2021.mp3UVA Law professors John C. Jeffries Jr. a73 and Daniel Ortiz are joined by GianCarlo Canaparo of the Heritage Foundation to discuss key decisions in the U.S. Supreme Courtas October 2020 term. The event was hosted by the Federalist Society at UVA Law.


A Career in Public Service

Streaming Audio Public_service_kickoff_Mary-Bauer.mp3Mary Bauer a90, executive director of the ACLU of Virginia, discusses her career path as a public interest lawyer in her keynote for the Public Service Joint Kickoff. This event was hosted by the Public Interest Law Association, the Program in Law and Public Service, and the Mortimer Caplin Public Service Center. Dean Risa Goluboff introduces Bauer.


Dean Risa Goluboff Welcomes Class of 2024

Streaming Audio Risa-Orientation-audio-FINAL.mp3Dean Risa Goluboff delivers her orientation address to the Class of 2024 in Caplin Auditorium.


Admissions Chief Natalie Blazer a08 Welcomes Class of 2024

Streaming Audio Natalie-orientation-audio.mp3Assistant Dean for Admissions Natalie Blazer a08 welcomes the Class of 2024 to orientation and their legal studies.


White Supremacy on Trial

Streaming Audio White-supremacy-AUDIO.mp3Four years after the deadly attack on the Charlottesville community, a federal lawsuit led by Integrity First for America is proceeding against the white supremacists in court. IFA Executive Director Amy Spitalnick, lead attorneys Karen Dunn and Roberta Kaplan, and Dean Risa Goluboff discuss the suit,A Sines v. Kessler, and the process of holding extremists accountable. UVA Batten School Dean Ian Solomon and UVA Law professor Micah Schwartzman a05 also offer remarks. This event was sponsored by UVA Lawas Karsh Center for Law and Democracy, The Miller Center, and the Jewish Studies Program in the College of Arts and Sciences at UVA.


Building a Law-and-Political-Economy Framework: Beyond the Twentieth-Century Synthesis

Streaming Audio Tax-June-11-beyond-20.mp3Yale Law professors Anne Alstott and Amy Kapczynski discuss the forthcoming Yale Law Journal article aBuilding a Law-and-Political-Economy Framework: Beyond the Twentieth-Century Synthesis," written by Jedediah S. Britton-Purdy, David Singh Grewal, Amy Kapczynski and Sabeel K. Rahman. UVA Law professor Ruth Mason, Oxford University professor Tsilly Dagan and other legal scholars comment on the work. This event was held as part of the aTax Meets Non-Taxa Oxford-Virginia Legal Dialogs workshop series that builds bridges from tax to other kinds of scholarship.


aCommon Lawa S3 E9: Separate Schools, Separate Worlds

Streaming Audio CommonLaw_S3_Ep9_JimRyan_FINAL.mp3Why are many K-12 schools still struggling with racial inequity and the legacy of segregation almost 70 years after Brown v. Board of Education? UVA President Jim Ryan a92 discusses the role of the Supreme Court, public policy and higher education in addressing the issue.


Commencement Addresses to the Class of 2021

Streaming Audio Goluboff-Janes-Powell-Combined-AUDIO.mp3For the prerecorded portion of Final Exercises for the Class of 2021, Dean Risa Goluboff, former Student Bar Association President Katharine Janes a21 and Supreme Court of Virginia Justice Cleo Powell a82 deliver remarks.A


aCommon Lawa S3 E8: The Goal of Equity in Womenas Soccer

Streaming Audio CommonLaw_S3_Ep8_Sanchez&Zabel_FINAL.mp3Despite dominating in international competition, the U.S. womenas soccer team is paid far less than their male counterparts. UVA Law professor Camilo SA!nchez and law student Jolena Zabel explore what playersa efforts around the world to achieve equity in pay and working conditions teach us.


Charge to the Class of 2021, With Professor Rachel Harmon

Streaming Audio Harmon-Charge-2021-AUDIO.mp3UVA Law professor Rachel Harmon delivers the Charge to the Class of 2021, following an introduction by Dean Risa Goluboff. This annual tradition offers parting words of wisdom to the graduating class.


aCommon Lawa S3 E7: From Trayvon Martin to George Floyd: The Trauma of Injustice

Streaming Audio Common Law S3 Ep 7 Angela Onwuachi-Willig FINAL with Warning.mp3Black communities experience lasting acultural traumaa from the lack of accountability for police and vigilante violence, explains Boston University School of Law Dean Angela Onwuachi-Willig.


PLACE and Power: The Environment and Native American Rights

Streaming Audio PLACE-Krakoff-Torres.mp3Professors Sarah Krakoff (University of Colorado) and Gerald Torres (Yale School of the Environment) discuss issues at the intersection of environmental governance and the rights and interests of Native American peoples. UVA Law professors Michael Livermore and Jon Cannon introduced and moderated the event.


Opportunities for Advocacy and Healing After the Chauvin Verdict

Streaming Audio Chauvin Trial-part-3.mp3UVA Batten School Dean Ian Solomon, UVA Police Diversity Officer Cortney Hawkins and Batten School Social Equity Advisor Marrissa Jones co-moderate a panel directly following the announcement of the verdict in the trial of Derek Chauvin. This panel featured a discussion of the verdict between community organizers, activists and scholars with expertise in organizing advocacy efforts, collective healing and trust-building in response to instances of racial injustice. The panelists are UVA Law professor Anne Coughlin; Brian N. Williams, an associate professor of public policy at UVA's Batten School; Burke Brownfeld, founder of Sig Global Services; Gene Cash, founder and CEO of Counseling Alliance of Virginia; Wyatt Rolla, interim director of the civil rights and racial justice program at the Legal Aid Justice Center; Valerie Lemmie, director of exploratory research at the Kettering Foundation; and Tia ShereIe Gaynor, an assistant professor of the University of Cincinnati and founding director of the Center for Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation. This event was the third of a four-part series examining Derek Chauvinas trial for the death of George Floyd and was co-sponsored by UVA Lawas Center for Criminal Justice, the UVA Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, and the UVA Police Department.


Value Creation by Business Lawyers

Streaming Audio Tax_business_audio.mp3Columbia Law School professor Ronald J. Gilson discusses his article, aValue Creation by Business Lawyers: Legal Skills and Asset Pricing,a for the aTax Meets Non-Taxa Oxford-Virginia Legal Dialogs workshop series that builds bridges from tax to other kinds of scholarship. UVA Law professor Ruth Mason and Oxfordas Tsilly Dagon host the event, and Penn Law professor Michael Knoll comments on Gilsonas work.A


Navigating the Derek Chauvin Trial: The Law and Policing

Streaming Audio Floyd Event- Part 2.mp3UVA Law professor Anne Coughlin and Batten School professor Brian N. Williams co-moderate a panel discussion of legal experts discussing a range of police topics, including the history of the profession, its culture, standards and training, accountability mechanisms and future efforts to reform. The panelists are Professor Rachel Harmon, director of the UVA Law Center for Criminal Justice; Shannon Dion, director of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services; Harvey Powers, director of the Division of Law Enforcement for the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Service; Gary Cordner, academy director for the Baltimore Police Department; and DeAnza Cook, Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University. This event was the second of a four-part series examining Derek Chauvinas ongoing trial for the death of George Floyd and was co-sponsored by UVA Lawas Center for Criminal Justice, the UVA Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, and the UVA Police Department.


Understanding the Derek Chauvin Trial

Streaming Audio Chauvin-trial- Part-One.mp3Professor Anne Coughlin leads a discussion of the legal landscape surrounding Derek Chauvinas ongoing trial for the death of George Floyd. Coughlin outlines the charges against Chauvin and what they mean, where the case stands currently and what to expect moving forward in the coming weeks. This event was the first of a four-part series examining the trial, and was co-sponsored by UVA Lawas Center for Criminal Justice, UVAas Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, and the UVA Police Department.


An Original Document for Every Song in aHamiltona

Streaming Audio Fed Soc- Hamilton Event.mp3Judge Charles Eskridge III of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas walks through the original documents that inspired the songs from the Broadway musical aHamilton.a This event was hosted by the Federalist Society.


aCommon Lawa S3 E6: Policing the Police

Streaming Audio CommonLaw_S3_Ep6_RachelHarmon_FINAL.mp3UVA Law professor Rachel Harmon, author of aThe Law of the Police,a says itas time for Americans to broadly rethink how we regulate the police.


Artificial Intelligence in Criminal Sentencing

Streaming Audio Artificial-Intelligence-panel.mp3A panel explores the increasingly prevalent use of artificial intelligence risk assessment tools in criminal sentencing, and whether the results of such predictive algorithms are appropriately admissible at sentencing hearings in court. Panelists include Professor Deborah Hellman; Professor Jessica M. Eaglin, IU Maurer Law; Julia Dressel, software engineer at Recidiviz; Alex Chohlas-Wood, executive director of the Stanford Computational Policy Lab and former director of analytics for NYPD, with moderator Judge Jed S. Rakoff, U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York. This event was co-hosted by The Virginia Journal of Law & Technology and the Virginia Journal of Criminal Law.


The Future of Live Animal Markets

Streaming Audio Animal Law-Event.mp3Ann Linder, Wildlife and Live Animal Markets Fellow with the Harvard Law School Animal Law & Policy Program, presents her research on the future of live animal markets. The event was sponsored by the Virginia Animal Law Society.


2021 Lile Moot Court Competition

Lile-Moot-Court-2021.mp3Third-year UVA Law students Mihir Khetarpal and Nina Oat, arguing for the appellant, face off against classmates Avery Rasmussen and Matt West, arguing for the appellee, in the final round of the Lile Moot Court competition. The judges are Megan Barbero, deputy general counsel of the U.S. House of Representatives; Judge Louis A. Bledsoe III, chief judge, North Carolina Business Court; and Judge Jerome A. Holmes, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.


aCommon Lawa S3 E5: Regulating Private Lives

Streaming Audio CommonLaw_S3_Ep5_MelissaMurray_FINAL.mp3From interracial marriage to LGBTQ rights, when the Supreme Court decriminalizes private behavior, other forms of regulation step in, says New York University School of Law professor Melissa Murray.


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